Endometriosis is often suffered in silence and overlooked by doctors

Endometriosis is often suffered in silence and overlooked by doctors

ENDOMETRIOSIS is a debilitating disease suf-fered by six million wom-en of reproductive age in this country, and yet is often overlooked by many who think their symptoms are simply bad period pains. Its name is derived from endometrium, the name of the cells that line the inside of the uterus and which build up and shed each month during the menstrual cycle. In endometriosis, the cells are deposited in areas outside of the uterus, and are affected by the same hormones that produce the monthly cycle. Common symptoms are pelvic pain, persistent cramps, lower back pain and fatigue. If untreated, it can lead to infertility, which is when it is most often diagnosed. "This is one of the most mistreated diseases in wom-en," says Dr. Tamer Seckin, Specialist Surgeon in Endo-metriosis, who is affiliated with Lenox Hill Hospital. "It can destroy a woman's life. It is debilitating." Seckin formed the Endometriosis Foundation of America (endofound.org) to focus on education and have healthcare providers take this disease seriously.

Endometriosis is often suffered in silence and overlooked by doctors
osis is often mistaken for IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) or appendicitis, or glossed over by women who think they just have to "deal with it" as part of their monthly cycle. The only way to properly diagnose endometriosis is with a laparoscopic exam. Under anesthesia, an incision is made in the abdomen and a laparoscope (a tube with a light in it) checks the organs. This shows the location and extent of any growths. While this disease can be treated, it is a chronic illness with no cure. "This disease needs to be taken seriously by healthcare officials. If not, it could lead to further surgeries," says Seckin. Stephanie St. James had been suffering for at least 10 years with excruciating peri-ods that left her bedridden, constipated and with extreme lower back pain. After a lap-aroscopic exam, the surgeon found that her colon was cemented to her uterus with endometrial cells, and part of her colon had to be removed. In St. James' case, the disease returned even more aggressively three years later, leading to further surgery. How did she deal with this? "By helping other women like myself who are suffering, and letting them know that they are not alone," she says. —Pamela Stern

“This is one of the most mistreated diseases in women,” says Tamer Seckin, Specialist Surgeon in Endometriosis, who is affiliated with Lenox Hill Hospital. “It can destroy a woman’s life. It is debilitating. This disease needs to be taken seriously by healthcare officials. If not, it could lead to further surgeries.”

//www.drseckin.com/member_files/topic_files/nypost2.pdf

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Reviews

  • Kim Molinaro

    Kim Molinaro

    Prior to meeting Dr. Seckin and reading his book, “The Doctor Will See You Now”, I knew little to nothing about endometriosis. I was led to believe that endometriosis was not a serious condition. I was told that the pain could be managed by taking the “pill”. I was told that the cysts on my ovaries were harmless. I was…

  • Rebecca Black

    Rebecca Black

    Fast forward 5 years to find out incidentally I had a failing kidney. My left kidney was only functioning at 18%. During this time, I was preparing all my documents to send to Dr. Seckin to review. However, with this new information I put everything on hold and went to a urologist. After a few months, no one could figure…

  • Monique Roberts

    Monique Roberts

    I'll never stop praising Dr. Seckin and his team. He literally gave me back my life.

  • Erin Brehm

    Erin Brehm

    I had a wonderful experience working with Dr. Seckin and his team before, during and after my surgery. I came to Dr. Seckin having already had laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis 5 years prior, with a different surgeon. My symptoms and pain had returned, making my life truly challenging and my menstrual cycle unbearable. Dr. Seckin was quick to validate my…

  • Anita Schillhorn

    Anita Schillhorn

    I came to Dr. Seckin after years of dealing with endometriosis and doctors who didn't fully understand the disease. He quickly ascertained what needed to be done, laid out the options along with his recommendation and gave me the time to make the right decision for me. My surgery went without a hitch and I'm healing very well. He and…