Warrior

Warrior

Women who are diagnosed with endometriosis seem to have an unstoppable drive to operate independently. This drive, which is often combined with an outstanding willpower, makes us appear like some kind of superwoman. A superwoman who is always in control and self-confident. The question arises how it is possible for us to cope with the famous killer cramps which are typical for endometriosis. How it is possible to lead a successful life beside the pain, which demands a high dose of energy.

Women who are diagnosed with endometriosis are often mentally extremely strong. They also appear to have a tendency to set high standards for themselves, are highly competitive and almost never seem to give up physically. It is not very hard to imagine the presence of these characteristics into daily life with endometriosis. We actually are capable to block pain mentally to extreme extends. Many times this pain is blocked until a pain level is reached which makes walking almost impossible. Even then we only take a rest period which is too short and does not correspond with the level of pain and discomfort. Everyday we are fighting against endometriosis, we refuse to let endometriosis take control over our bodies and lives. It is confronting though to see that many other women in our surroundings seem to live an active life without any effort. As a result we seem to have a tendency to create a coping mechanism which makes other people, and ourselves, believe we can do just the same. It also suits us just fine to have jobs and lead lives where aiming for order and perfection, dealing with pressure and taking responsibility often are normal facets in daily life. Ironically our surroundings, for example colleagues, sometimes have no clue about how we battle endometriosis every day.

The question arises how it is possible for us to develop such an extreme coping mechanism which can sometimes suppress the killer cramps for years before we go see a doctor. How it is possible to cope with chronic exposure to pain? Research shows that we use, or more likely abuse, adrenaline. The adrenaline levels are chronically exploited which makes it possible for us to repress the pain and keep on living our busy daily lives and challenge the daily hassle. For a limited period of time that is. It often seems that we have an infinite source of energy which allows us to keep moving forward and that chronic fatigue is relatively irrelevant. Overcompensation of adrenaline levels usually only occurs during a fight or flight response, a response to a perceived harmful event. This response is a physiological reaction that causes adrenaline levels to increase which as a result gives our body a boost. Of course this overcompensation of adrenaline can only last for a certain period of time before there will be a turning point. It’s impossible for the human body to keep operating in a fight or flight state. This "false" energy will cause a hormonal imbalance that causes fatigue. This turning point can many times be seen as a milestone since this is often the moment when a doctor is consulted. At this point the realisation that the pain that comes with endometriosis is not normal often kicks in.

This strong personality that enables us to move on, even though the pain is many times unbearable, is founded by both nurture and nature. Repeatedly we have to stand our ground and fight for acceptance with respect to mental, physical and social aspects. How many times are we not believed by doctors, teachers, colleagues or even friends or family? That people think we complain and exaggerate to get attention? That we try to get away from work or school or that it is seen as a cry for love from family or men. All these experiences go with frustration, anger and the feeling of not being accepted or being believed. These negative experiences could be fundamental for the highly competitive attitude and the tendency to set high standards. It forms our personality and behaviour. When not being believed time after time, the will to prove that the pain is not a cry for attention can take over. A will that appears to be so strong it can push the pain to the background and can toughen you up to extreme levels. When we take a look at nature, research shows that for memory consolidation a brain mechanism called protein synthesis is required. There is an important role of DNA in protein synthesis. When memories are based on experiences that are colored with feelings of anger and frustration, the DNA that is involved through protein synthesis will also contain these emotions that go with the memory. 

Women who are diagnosed with endometriosis are often fighting this constant battle since their early teens. Dr. Seckin believes that this battle creates a certain personality. A so called "Type E personality." Out of necessity our personalities become strong and highly-independent. Women are used to fighting endometriosis and everybody who does not take this invisible disease seriously. Over and over. As we all know, it is important to spread awareness. Many support groups can be found in social media, like Endo Warriors. It is of great importance to make this invisible disease visible by talking about the symptoms and how endometriosis influences our daily lives. Also it is important to help each other, give each other advice and share good and bad moments. How a woman becomes a "warrior" driven to spread awareness and help others is amazing. We have to, and we will, keep on fighting, fighting like only a girl can do! 

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Patient Reviews

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  • Angela Aro

    I have struggled with endometriosis and adenomyosis since first starting my period at 13. I was diagnosed at 21 and what followed was a series of unsuccessful surgeries and treatments. My case was very aggressive and involved my urinary tract system and my intestines. After exhausting all of my local doctors I was lucky enough to find Dr. Seckin. We…

  • Emi O

    Seckin and Dr. Goldstein changed my life!

  • Kristin Sands

    Like so many women who have tirelessly sought a correct diagnosis and proper, thorough medical treatment for endometriosis, I found myself 26 years into this unwanted journey without clear answers or help from four previous gynecological doctors and two emergency laparoscopic surgeries. I desperately wanted to avoid the ER again; a CT scan for appendicitis also revealed a likely endometrioma…

  • Wilfredo Reyes

    Dr. Seckin literally gave my wife her life back. I am eternally grateful to him for his generous, determined spirit to see that Melanie finally live free from the prison bonds of Endometriosis.

  • Carla

    I am so grateful to Dr Seckin and Dr. Goldstein. My experience was nothing short of amazing. I was misdiagnosed with the location of my fibroids and have had a history of endometriosis. Dr. Seckin was the one who accurately diagnosed me. Dr Seckin and Dr. Goldstein really care about their patients and it shows. They listened to my concerns,…

  • Melissa Boudreau

    When I think of Dr. Seckin these are the words that come to mind. Gratitude, grateful, life-changing, a heart of gold. I feel compelled to give you a bit of background so you can understand the significance of this surgery for me. I am passionate about Endometriosis because it has affected me most of my life and I have a…

  • Jaclyn Harte

    Dr. Seckin and Dr. Goldstein radically changed my quality of life. They treat their patients with dignity & respect that I've personally never seen in the literally 25+ doctors I've seen for endometriosis. This summer, I had a surgery with Dr. Seckin & Goldstein. It was my first with them, but my 5th endo surgery. I couldn't believe the difference,…

  • Megan Rafael Moreno

    I was in pain for 2 years. I was getting no answers, and because dr Goldstein and dr seckins were willing to see and treat me I'm finally feeling almost back to normal. They were very down to earth and helpful in my time of need. Dr Goldstein was easy to talk to and caring, she took care of me…

  • Nancy Costa

    Dr. Seckin is one of the best endometriosis surgeon. Every time I go to the office, he really listens to me and is always concerned about my issues. Dr Seckin's office staff are a delight and they always work with me. I feel I can leave everything to them and they will take care of it. Thank you to the…

  • Rebecca Black

    Fast forward 5 years to find out incidentally I had a failing kidney. My left kidney was only functioning at 18%. During this time, I was preparing all my documents to send to Dr. Seckin to review. However, with this new information I put everything on hold and went to a urologist. After a few months, no one could figure…

  • Monique Roberts

    I'll never stop praising Dr. Seckin and his team. He literally gave me back my life.

  • Erin Brehm

    I had a wonderful experience working with Dr. Seckin and his team before, during and after my surgery. I came to Dr. Seckin having already had laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis 5 years prior, with a different surgeon. My symptoms and pain had returned, making my life truly challenging and my menstrual cycle unbearable. Dr. Seckin was quick to validate my…

  • Anita Schillhorn

    I came to Dr. Seckin after years of dealing with endometriosis and doctors who didn't fully understand the disease. He quickly ascertained what needed to be done, laid out the options along with his recommendation and gave me the time to make the right decision for me. My surgery went without a hitch and I'm healing very well. He and…

  • Nicholette Sadé

    Dr. Seckin brought me back to life! I am now 3 weeks into my recovery after my laparoscopy surgery, and I feel like a new and improved woman! Being diagnosed with Endometriosis, then 25yrs old in 2015, and discovering the severity of my case being stage 4, made me devastated. Dr. Seckin's vast knowledge of the disease, sincere empathy, and…