A Pain You Can’t Ignore: Endometriosis

Stomachaches, nausea, cramps. What you think is just part of being female could actually be a dangerous, debilitating disease. Here’s what you need to know about endometriosis — and why exercise could be the best antidote of all.

— By Kristina Grish

What Is Endometriosis?

Last January, after a long run, I sat down to a delicious dinner of Thai takeout — then sprinted to the bathroom three hours later. Diarrhea turned to blood, and when I thought I was well enough to stand, I actually passed out. My husband, Scott, found me a few feet from the toilet with my pants around my ankles. He was scared; I was mortified. We’d been married only six months, and this was hardly newlywed bliss.

I blamed dodgy tofu, or maybe a bad mango salad. My symptoms persisted through the night, so I called a gastroenterologist the next morning. He saw me right away and scheduled a colonoscopy. The verdict? Inflammation and impaired blood flow to the large intestine, a problem most common in men and women over the age of 60. I’m 33.

The stomach pain, nausea, and diarrhea continued for several weeks, coupled with sharp cramps and deep pain during sex. My GI doctor prescribed a common antispasm medication to calm my intestinal issues. I saw a food allergist to manage my diet and bloating, and an acupuncturist to help with the cramps. I still exercised, though not as often. I found that high-intensity Spinning, when I felt up to it, muted the pain.

After months of turmoil, my gyno performed laparoscopic surgery; this revealed that I have endometriosis, a chronic disease in which the uterus’s endometrial lining begins to grow elsewhere, such as on other pelvic organs, interfering with their function and potentially damaging the bladder, intestines, and appendix. Surgery, the only sure way to confirm and correct the condition, showed that the sticky endometrial lining was binding my left ovary to my intestines and uterus, putting pressure on the organs and likely causing the intestinal problems. It had also grown on both ovaries and the area behind my uterus, which contributed to my stomach pain.

Listen to Your Gut

Endometriosis is a problem that more than 80 million women across the world suffer from — with at least 10 million cases in the United States alone, according to the Endometriosis Research Center. It’s one of the top three causes of infertility, is the source of an estimated 80 percent of chronic pelvic pain, and accounts for more than half of the 600,000 hysterectomies performed annually. A 2007 study calculated that costs of endometriosis care in the U.S. reached $22 billion in one year alone.

Yet because few women share details about something so personal, it’s easy to feel, as I did, confused about what’s happening. Here’s what I learned: During a normal period, the uterus sheds its endometrial lining, and small amounts of endometrial cells pass harmlessly through the pelvic area and exit the body. But in an endometriosis patient, when these cells are shed they invade other areas of the body. They frequently implant themselves on the uterus, ovaries, fallopian

Twelve years ago Mary Frances Mango, 35, a nurse in Smithtown, New York, was diagnosed with Endometriosis. After the surgery, he [Dr. Seckin] put her on a mild birth control pill to moderate estrogen levels and lower the chance of future growth. So far, she’s pain-free.

//www.drseckin.com/member_files/topic_files/fitness.pdf

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Patient Reviews

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  • Rebecca Black

    Fast forward 5 years to find out incidentally I had a failing kidney. My left kidney was only functioning at 18%. During this time, I was preparing all my documents to send to Dr. Seckin to review. However, with this new information I put everything on hold and went to a urologist. After a few months, no one could figure…

  • Monique Roberts

    I'll never stop praising Dr. Seckin and his team. He literally gave me back my life.

  • Erin Brehm

    I had a wonderful experience working with Dr. Seckin and his team before, during and after my surgery. I came to Dr. Seckin having already had laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis 5 years prior, with a different surgeon. My symptoms and pain had returned, making my life truly challenging and my menstrual cycle unbearable. Dr. Seckin was quick to validate my…

  • Anita Schillhorn

    I came to Dr. Seckin after years of dealing with endometriosis and doctors who didn't fully understand the disease. He quickly ascertained what needed to be done, laid out the options along with his recommendation and gave me the time to make the right decision for me. My surgery went without a hitch and I'm healing very well. He and…

  • Nicholette Sadé

    Dr. Seckin brought me back to life! I am now 3 weeks into my recovery after my laparoscopy surgery, and I feel like a new and improved woman! Being diagnosed with Endometriosis, then 25yrs old in 2015, and discovering the severity of my case being stage 4, made me devastated. Dr. Seckin's vast knowledge of the disease, sincere empathy, and…

  • Jason Curry

    My wife had her laparoscopic excision surgery to remove endometriosis with Dr. Seckin on Jan 30, 2014. She doesn't write online reviews so I'm writing this on her behalf. I accompanied her with each office visit she had. The staff--Lucy and Kim, are very friendly, warm and professional. Dr. Seckin was excellent in every capacity. He spent a lot of…

  • Liz Filippelli

    He is an awesome doctor who saved my daughters life from debilitating endometriosis..she knew instantly upon awaking from surgery that she was better..that wad May and no complaints only praises for Dr. Wonderful Seckin!!

  • Karen N

    I was diagnosed with Endometriosis at 19. I saw several Endometriosis "Specialists" since then, had a few laproscopic surgeries to "remove" the endometriosis and continued to be in pain. I had a hysterectomy in 2012 and was told this would stop the pain once and for all. No such luck! Tired of spending days in bed with a heating pad,…

  • Lauren Rodriguez

    I researched and found Dr. Seckin after dealing with years of doctors who couldn't help me or refused to go the extra mile for their patients. I have to say I am truly blessed to have found such a compassionate and talented doctor. He is exquisite with everything he does, and both his team at the office and surgical team…

  • Kellya Vespa

    Dr. Seckin is a very skilled surgeon. There are not many doctors like him that truly understand the effects of endometriosis. I am lucky to have found him. The staff is wonderful too.

  • Meg Connolly

    Dr. Seckin truly LOVES what he does and cares about his patients from the bottom of his heart. My life has already changed in 3 weeks and I couldn’t be more grateful. Should I ever need another operation for endometriosis, Dr. Seckin will be the one to do it. I recommend him to anyone I come across with similar problems…

  • Elisandra O

    Dr. Seckin is an amazing Doctor he is very compassionate, caring and he will be honest with you. He's been my doctor for 19yrs and I am so grateful to have someone taking care of me that knows what he is doing and knows the best way to treat each and every situation. I would definitely recommend him and his…